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Hopeful, creative, effective action for the wild…

The forests and wildlife of the northeastern United States have undergone a dramatic resurgence during the past century. While cause for hope, this remarkable recovery is incomplete. Our region’s natural heritage is increasingly threatened by development, pollution, forest fragmentation, climate change, and unstable ownership. The need to permanently protect wild lands and waters has never been greater. The Northeast Wilderness Trust is meeting this challenge, working with private landowners and other partners to save wildlife habitat from the Adirondacks to Maine. The Trust is the only regional land trust focused exclusively on preserving wilderness areas—places where nature directs the ebb and flow of life. Since its founding in 2002, the Trust has conserved more than 35,000 acres in Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, New York, Massachusetts, and Connecticut. Continuing this record of success depends on you—please join us!

FEATURED PROJECT

IN PROGRESS: The Sawtelle Addition

Expanding the Binney Hill Wilderness Preserve for wildlife and people

“The Wapack Trail is a scenic and historic gem of New England, but it is only as permanent as the land through which it passes. The Sawtelle Addition to the Binney Hill Wilderness Preserve would …
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Latest News

NWT Launches 5-Year Strategic Plan

Our brand new strategic plan outlines our tactics to drastically scale up wilderness conservation across the Northeast over the next five years. Using four central pillars, Protect, Connect, Champion, and Sustain, we aim to add 25,000 acres of new forever-wild land by 2025.

Eagle Mountain Success

With the slap of her tail, the beaver formally welcomed us to her domain. She dipped back under the tannin-brown water, reemerged, slapped again, and zigzagged around her lodge. This river was her home, not ours; we were interlopers in her wild place.
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Return to Grandeur

Right around Carver or Kingston, southbound travelers reach a transition zone—an ecotone—between the realm of Northern Hardwood Forest and the beginning of the Atlantic Coastal Pine Barrens. The composition of the trees becomes heavily pine and oak. The forest floor is littered with dry needles, and scrubby shrubs make up the understory.
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Our Privacy Policy

The Northeast Wilderness Trust respects the privacy of its supporters and visitors to this website. The Trust does not sell, share, or rent information provided to us through this website or via email, phone, or postal service. You can have complete confidence that any personal information you share with us will be strictly protected in perpetuity—like the landscapes we work to protect.