Events

Come Explore The Binney Hill Preserve

When: July 29, 2017 from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM
Where: Binney Hill Preserve, Binney Hill Road, New Ipswich

Have you ever wondered whats happening at The Binney Hill Preserve? Or felt the urge to explore the Wapack Wilderness? Now’s your chance to see what its all about. Join us on Saturday, July 29th for a guided tour!

You’ll have the chance to learn first hand about the trails and natural communities that can be found on the properties from your guides, NWT Conservation Assistant Shelby Perry and AmeriCorps member Ira Shadis.

This event is family friendly and open to the public with two options available, a walk from
10 am – 12 pm and a hike beginning at 1 pm. The trail head is located on Binney Hill Road in New Ipswich, NH.

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Making the Most of GPS Apps

When: August 13, 2016 from 9:00 AM to 11:00 AM
Where: Wadhams Library & Wadhams Lookout Trail, 763 NYS Route 22, Wadhams, NY

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Shelby Perry has several years of experience collecting GPS data in the field using mobile devices.

NWT Conservation Assistant Shelby Perry will lead this workshop on using mobile GPS apps. This workshop is sponsored by Champlain Area Trails and is geared towards beginners. Participants will learn how to import tracks and property bounds onto their personal devices for viewing in the field. Sourcing of parcel data will be covered, but it will not be the main focus. After the indoor presentation at the Wadhams Library, the group will move outside to view their imports, use them to navigate, collect points and tracks, and learn how to share our collected data with others in a useful format.

Required Materials:  1) iPhone, Android phone, or other data-capable tablet (all devices must be WiFi enabled, and data capable, but a data plan on your device is not required to use these apps);  2) Motion X GPS ($.99 for iPhone, $1.99 for iPad/Android) or Gaia GPS ($19.99) already installed;  3) An email app and active email address that you can check from your phone/device.

Requested donation of $15/person. Register online here or contact Champlain Area Trails at 518-962-2287.

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Bark: Get to Know Your Trees (Field Class)

When: October 11, 2014 from 9:00 AM to 1:00 PM
Where: Wild Forest, Location Provided to Registrants, Westport, NY area

Join us for a field class with Michael Wojtech, naturalist, writer, and author of Bark: A Field Guide to Trees of the Northeast.

The traits typically used to describe trees—leaves, twigs, and buds—are often hard to see or seasonally absent. As you hone your perceptive abilities you will learn about a system for identifying tree species by their bark, and discover why such a variety of bark characteristics exist. Why do some species have smooth bark, while on others it is thick and broken? Why does bark peel? Join Michael for an exploration of bark, which is always visible, in any season. Open to naturalists at all levels of experience.

The Saturday field outing is $45 and registration is required. Participants will be exploring forests in the Essex, NY area and will be given the location meeting place upon registration. Contact Elizabeth Lee, Outdoor Guide ( or 518.962.4756) to register and for more information.

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Bark: Get to Know Your Trees

When: October 10, 2014 from 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Where: Whallonsburg Grange, Corner of Route 22 and Whallons Bay Road, Whallonsburg, NY

Join us for a presentation by Michael Wojtech, naturalist, writer, and author of Bark: A Field Guide to Trees of the Northeast.

The traits typically used to describe trees—leaves, twigs, and buds—are often hard to see or seasonally absent. As you hone your perceptive abilities you will learn about a system for identifying tree species by their bark, and discover why such a variety of bark characteristics exist. Why do some species have smooth bark, while on others it is thick and broken? Why does bark peel? In this evening slide show, Michael will share images and strategies for seeing bark with new eyes.

$10 suggested donation, no registration required. This event is cosponsored by Elizabeth Lee, Outdoor Guide.

On Saturday, join Michael for a half-day field exploration of bark, which is always visible, in any season. Learn more about Saturday’s field class.

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From Local to Global: A Wilderness-Forever Future

When: July 24, 2014 from 6:00 PM to 8:30 PM
Where: Doris L. Benz Community Center, 18 Heard Road, Center Sandwich

In a richly-illustrated presentation featuring photos from the White Mountains to Patagonia, writer and conservationist Tom Butler marks the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act’s passage with a wide-ranging tour of wild places, wild values, and and wild ideas for how we can protect nature in the 21st century and beyond.

Please join us for light appetizers at 6:00 pm followed by presentation at 7:00 pm. RSVP requested. Please email or call 802.224.1000.

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Timber Rattlesnakes in Folklore and Fact


When: April 25, 2014 from 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Where: Whallonsburg Grange, Corner of Route 22 and Whallons Bay Road, Whallonsburg, NY

The timber rattlesnake has long been feared and despised by many people. But scientific studies have shown them to be complex animals—predator and prey; solitary and social; slow to reproduce, but fast when striking. Learn more about this fascinating creature (found at Split Rock Mountain, among other places in New York), from the bounty era, when a rattler was worth $5, to the modern era of legal protection.

Presenter Joe Racette is the New York State Wildlife Action Plan Coordinator and has worked for the Department of Environmental Conservation for 22 years. For 10 years, he worked on Lake Champlain projects, monitoring toxic pollution, invasive species, and eutrophication. His recent work has included projects on habitat connectivity, colonial waterbirds, Peregrine falcons, Bicknell’s thrush, and timber rattlesnakes.

This event is cosponsored by Northeast Wilderness Trust and Elizabeth Lee, Outdoor Guide. Suggested donation $8.

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Bird Language Through the Seasons

When: March 7, 2014 from 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Where: Whallonsburg Grange, Corner of Route 22 and Whallons Bay Road, Whallonsburg, NY

Join Connor Stedman in a rich exploration of the voices and behavior of birds. After reviewing the basics of bird language, we’ll dive into how birds journey through the seasons in their strategies for survival. Knowing what to track in bird language and behavior across different times of year is a powerful tool for understanding ecology and revealing the hidden stories of the landscape.

Connor Stedman is a lifelong naturalist with 10 years of experience sharing nature awareness and traditional skills with students of all ages. He is the director of the Vermont Wilderness School and teaches courses in bird language, wildcrafting, and land stewardship around the Northeast.

This event is cosponsored by Northeast Wilderness Trust and Elizabeth Lee, Outdoor Guide. Suggested donation $8.

Connor Stedman will also lead a field class on Saturday, March 8 from 9:00 am to 1:00 pm. During this half-day in the field, participants will explore the relationship between bird language, tracking, and winter ecology. We’ll put our bird language and tracking skills to the test and learn to read the language of the forest more deeply. Come with eyes and ears wide open and your curiosity stoked for what’s happening in the natural world, just two weeks out from the spring equinox.

Cost is $25. Space is limited. Pre-registration required; email Elizabeth Lee at to secure a spot.

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Animals of the North: What Will Climate Change Mean for Them?

When: February 21, 2014 from 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Where: Whallonsburg Grange, Corner of Route 22 and Whallons Bay Road, Whallonsburg, NY

Moose in wetland © Susan C. Morse

Renowned educator, tracker, and photographer Susan Morse will talk about the ways in which northern wildlife species are already being affected by climate change, with more serious challenges ahead. Canada lynx, moose, American marten, caribou, polar bears, and arctic fox, as well as arctic marine and waterfowl ecology, are some of the species and subjects covered in this slideshow. The program will devote time to sharing stunningly beautiful images of animals and their northern habitats–all in the spirit of Jane Goodall’s “reason for hope.”

This event is cosponsored by Northeast Wilderness Trust and Elizabeth Lee, Outdoor Guide.

Suggested donation $8.

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Fate of the Wild? Extreme Energy & Wilderness

When: October 24, 2013 from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM
Where: The Thoreau Institute, 44 Baker Farm Road, Lincoln

Please join us for a talk by Tom Butler and a reception hosted by Northeast Wilderness Trust in the Boston area.

In a provocative, photo-rich presentation, writer and conservation activist Tom Butler explores the future of wild nature and human life in a toxic global energy economy. From decapitated mountains in Appalachia to proposed river-killing dams in Patagonia to the fracking boom across North America, the era of extreme energy extraction is here. Might the complementary goals of transforming the energy economy and protecting wilderness help lead to an era when both natural and human communities can flourish?

Tom Butler is the editorial projects director of the Foundation for Deep Ecology. His books include Wildlands Philanthropy, Plundering Appalachia, and most recently, ENERGY: Overdevelopment and the Delusion of Endless Growth.

Please join us for hearty hors d’oeuvres, wine, beer, and cider at 6:00 p.m. followed by presentation at 7:00 p.m. RSVP requested. Please call 802.224.1000 or email

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Bird Language Field Workshop

When: May 5, 2013 from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM

What can bird language reveal about the natural world?  This full-day workshop offers an experiential introduction to observing and interpreting bird language in the field. Participants will build familiarity with local bird species; learn the “5 voices” of bird language and how to interpret them; practice field observation and movement skills; develop recognition of common bird language “signatures”; and leave with steps for further learning.

Cost is $45. Enrollment is limited and preregistration is required. The group will meet in the Essex, NY area (exact location will be provided upon registration). Contact Elizabeth Lee at for registration information.

Workshop leader Connor Stedman is a field naturalist, wilderness educator, and ecological designer. He has been mentoring students of all ages in nature awareness since 2004, and leads courses in natural history, bird language, wilderness skills, and agroforestry throughout the Northeast. Connor is currently completing an M.S. in Ecological Planning at the University of Vermont.

The program is being jointly offered by Northeast Wilderness Trust and Elizabeth Lee, Outdoor Guide.

Please note that this is a newly opened Sunday class; Saturday workshop is full.

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Wild & Connected Series: Bird Language

When: May 3, 2013 from 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Where: Whallonsburg Grange, corner of Route 22 and Whallons Bay Road, Whallonsburg, NY

Do you know what that bird is saying? Bird language is the communication network of the forest, long understood by trackers from around the world. It offers a unique window into ecology, animal behavior, and the relationship between people and nature. This evening presentation will introduce the core patterns of bird language through images, sound, and storytelling.

Presenter Connor Stedman is a field naturalist, wilderness educator, and ecological designer. He has been mentoring students of all ages in nature awareness since 2004, and leads courses in natural history, bird language, wilderness skills, and agroforestry throughout the Northeast. Connor is currently completing an M.S. in Ecological Planning at the University of Vermont.

The program is being jointly offered by Northeast Wilderness Trust and Elizabeth Lee, Outdoor Guide. Suggested donation is $10.

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Riparian Buffers: Natural Corridors for Wild Nature

When: May 19, 2012 from 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM
Where: Meeting Location Provided to Registrants, Boquet River, Whallonsburg, NY

Come explore the ever-changing landscape along the Boquet River! Ecologist Elizabeth Thompson will lead us through these riparian natural communities and help us discover their role in providing connected habitat for plants and animals. Director of Conservation Science for the Vermont Land Trust and co-author of Wetland, Woodland, Wildland: A Guide to the Natural Communities of Vermont, Liz Thompson also helped start Vermont’s Natural Heritage Program, identifying fragile natural areas of importance to biological diversity and shaping strategies for their protection. She has advised many communities on priorities for conservation planning, and has taught field botany and plant ecology at the University of Vermont.

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Frogs and Salamanders on the Move: Amphibians and Connectivity

When: April 28, 2012 from 6:30 PM to 9:00 PM
Where: TBD, Location Provided to Registrants, Essex, NY

Green Frog (© Larry Master)

As the spring chorus of amphibians returns, so too comes the annual threat of roads to the survival of our region’s frogs and salamanders as they migrate across land to reach their breeding wetlands. Habitat fragmentation, along with amphibians’ sensitivity to changes in the environment, has landed these critters among the most threatened vertebrate organisms.  Join Dr. David Patrick of Paul Smith’s College for an overview of the amphibian diversity in the region and their ecology.

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Keeping Track Teams to Collect Data

When: February 11, 2012 from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
Where: Wild Forests, Various Locations, Essex, NY and Jericho, VT

Two teams of citizen scientists are being trained this year to monitor the presence and movement of wildlife in the Champlain Valley. The Keeping Track training program will teach students to detect and interpret wildlife tracks and sign and collect data about bears, bobcats, moose, and other animals. The information will help us identify key habitats between the Adirondack and Green Mountains, a high priority linkage for conservation. Trainings begin in New York in January 2012. Anyone interested in learning to “read” the forest and monitor wildlife presence is encouraged to enroll.

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Wild & Wonderfully Near Us: Bobcat Recovery in the Champlain Valley

When: January 26, 2012 from 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Where: Whallonsburg Grange, Corner of Route 22 and Whallons Bay Road, Whallonsburg, NY

Wildlife expert Susan Morse of Keeping Track will give a slideshow and talk about bobcats (Lynx rufus). Once found throughout most of North America, bobcats were decimated in the early to mid 1900s due to the value of their fur. Come learn more about these beautiful spotted wildcats whose populations are reviving across our region.

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Wildlife Prepares for Winter in the Champlain Valley

When: December 10, 2011 from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM
Where: Wild Forest, Location Provided to Registrants, Westport, NY

Expert naturalist Alcott Smith will lead this program in the Split Rock Wildway in the Champlain Valley of New York, where cold weather has arrived. On this field foray into the northeastern forest, participants will track wild nature to learn how species cope with and adapt to the cooling weather and talk about how local wild lands connect habitat for wildlife and nature.

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Getting Wild & Connected: A 7,000-mile Trek Along the Eastern Wildway

When: September 6, 2011 from 5:30 PM to 7:00 PM
Where: Memorial Lounge, Waterman Building, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT

On Tuesday, September 6, 2011, the Trust sponsored a talk by wilderness explorer and conservationist John Davis, who is in the midst of a 7,000-mile outdoor journey that is drawing attention to the need to restore, protect, and connect the East’s wildest places. Called TrekEast, Davis is traveling by foot, bike, and boat from Florida to the tip of the Gaspé Peninsula in Quebec, and has already trekked almost 5,500 miles through swamps, rivers, and mountains.

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